Art Hound, a guide to living with art Art Hound

on the hunt for good art

BSDA Artist Interview: Michelle Fleck

Tuesday, November 4, 2014

San Francisco-based artist Michelle Fleck is back with new work on Buy Some Damn Art. 

Michelle-fleck-boxed-in_full_600

Boxed In

KATE: Your artwork deals with urban environments. How was the city of San Francisco, and your neighborhood in particular, evolved since you started painting these landscapes? Are you still inspired by the same things?

MICHELLE: Living in SF for almost 10 years now, I’ve always been drawn to scenes from urban landscapes and the intersection of the man-made and nature. As of late, my work has been impacted by witnessing this city undergo rapid change. My neighborhood keeps developing and every time I leave the house it seems like something new pops up. This series in particular was inspired by watching large condo units being built where there were once longtime vacant lots. A lot of the pieces depict the potted plants being brought in to add greenery these newly completed buildings. This group of paintings explores urban expansion and finds beauty in these moments of newness and change.

Michelle-Fleck-waiting-room_full_600

Waiting Room

KATE: Can you talk a bit about your palette, which includes bright pink, orange and neon green?

MICHELLE: I love bright, artificial colors (what can I say, I grew up in the 90s loving Lisa Frank!) and often juxtapose them with more muted or subdued earth tones. These contrasting color families always jump out at me when I’m walking around the city, and I find them really stunning when placed side by side in my work. They act as a visual metaphor for the concepts I explore in my work.

KATE: A recurrent theme in your work is the sectioning off of certain areas by the use of plastic fencing and stakes and rope. What lies behind this theme?

MICHELLE: I think I’m drawn to these barriers because they speak to our pattern as humans to exert control over a space or situation. The fences, ropes, string and caution tape are all metaphors for control and containment, or separation of man and nature.


Michelle-Fleck-High-Rise_full_600

High Rise


KATE: Have you ever dabbled in mixed-media or incorporated found objects in your works?

MICHELLE: Honestly, not so much lately!  I love and have always loved paint. While I like the idea of branching out to new media, I’m kind of a perfectionist, so I always find myself going back to what medium I’m most comfortable with.

Michelle-Fleck-Artificial-Nature_full copy

Artificial Nature


KATE: What is inspiring you to create new work at this point in time?

MICHELLE: Being in the Bay Area, where art has a huge presence, really keeps me going. And as opportunities to show work keep coming up, that inspires me to continue creating as well.

.

See/read  a studio visit with Michelle here.

→ 2 Comments

BSDA Artist Interview: Noémie Jennifer

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

There is a new show on Buy Some Damn Art by Brooklyn artist Noémie Jennifer.

pillar_primaryshot copy 3

Pillar

KATE: You spent time at both Brown and RISD. Do you feel that either prepared you for your post-college life as an artist and creative person? If what what has?

NOÉMIE: Brown and RISD are great places to learn how to value, follow and theoretically carry out your ideas. But they didn’t do too much to prepare me for all the practical aspects of post-college life (I think maybe RISD does a little bit more of that, but I can’t speak to it as I was technically full-time at Brown and just took some classes at RISD on the side). All of that practical knowledge I gained afterward, often from people in totally different industries. I worked office jobs, then transitioned into self-employment, and from there finally feel like I have the right tools to transition into creative self-employment. But I’m not there yet and I still have a lot to learn.

9_indexedb1

Untitled, 2010.

KATE: A few years ago your drawings were restrained, organic and calming. Today your work seems quite different-  bold, charged. The thin lines have been replaced by much heavier marks. Is there a link between these periods of work that viewers might not recognize?

NOÉMIE: I have so many paintings in my head right now that layer organic marks with bolder, more graphic marks, and I feel like both those strains of work are languages I want to learn in their own right before bringing them together.

fold_angle2 copy

Fold

KATE: What role do the grids play in these works? How much is the process part of the final product?

NOÉMIE: Process is hugely important to me and it’s very transparent in these works. I can trace these back to their beginning pretty easily—they start and end with the grid (first in pencil, then in ink). So it’s a guide through the process, and then gets layered on top of everything else. I like how grids and patterns can go in and out of focus, how they both show things and hide them.

spine_angledetail copy

Spine

KATE: What does it mean to you to be an artist?

NOÉMIE: Well…I think I could probably find a different way to answer that question at any given moment of the day! So I’ll go with what feels right as I’m writing this: it means that I get to spend several hours today thinking other than in words.

400x600x7_IMG_0693.jpg.pagespeed.ic.hPv-sNCDpe

Art Transformer Project in Providence, Rhode Island.

KATE: Can you tell us a bit about the Art Transformer Project?

NOÉMIE: Sure! I was living back in Providence for a few months when the city’s call for proposals went out. It was a while before I heard back (we are talking about city government here!) and I was eventually selected, as one of twelve artists, to paint electrical transformer boxes across the city. I painted my three boxes in over 90-degree heat in the summer of 2013, adapting paintings from my “Indexed” series to the 3D object. It was a step out of my comfort zone to work outside, as I’m usually very private when I’m working, but eventually I found interactions with passersby fun and rewarding. I would definitely do it again.

→ 4 Comments

Artist Crush: Mariko Wada

Monday, October 27, 2014

Mariko Wada was born in Osaka, Japan. She has lived in Denmark since 1998.

“In recent years her works have explored the role of ceramics in a reality that is largely mediated and virtual. The special physical qualities of ceramics allow her works to heighten the appreciation of object and space respectively; two basic human anchor points that are greatly subjected to mediatory influences. By using the organic plasticity and material immediacy of ceramics, she creates works that demand physical presence…

Clay is worked directly with the hands in an intensive process that often lasts hours and days. The slow, intense working process gives ceramic objects a special immediacy. The result is not an image, but concrete, physical objects that anchor the person in a ‘here and now’ of bodiliness and sensation.” – Louise Mazanti

_mg_3383_1720

.

.

.

_mg_3364_1119

.

.

.

_mg_3375_1720

.

.

.

_mg_0022_1720

.

.

.
6_wada-kopi-2_790

.

.

.

p5160571_1200

→ No Comments

Artist Crush: Tim Hussey

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Tim Hussey is a Los Angeles-based artist.

bigblue.M

.

.

.

IMG_1291m

.

.

.


IMG_4801f

.

.

.

IMG_8829f

.

.

.

IMG_4710f

.

.

.

IMG_4661f

.

via George Gallery.

→ No Comments

Artist Crush: Patti Roberts-Pizzuto

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Patti Roberts-Pizzuto creates one-of-a-kind mixed media works on beautiful handmade paper. She works from her studio in South Dakota.

Screen Shot 2014-10-21 at 9.35.01 AM

.

.

.

Screen Shot 2014-10-20 at 12.23.09 PM

.

.

.

Screen Shot 2014-10-21 at 9.33.58 AM

.

.

.

Screen Shot 2014-10-21 at 9.34.19 AM

.

.

.

Screen Shot 2014-10-21 at 10.06.51 AM

→ 1 Comment